Tutti gli articoli di Stefania Raveane

Parmitano a bordo dell’ISS

Finalmente è arrivato il momento che abbiamo tanto aspettato: Luca Parmitano è ufficialmente a bordo della Stazione Spaziale Internazionale (ISS).
Questa è il primo step che ci dice che il giorno del contatto si sta avvicinando!

Con una partenza in perfetto orario alle 18.28 italiane del 20 luglio, la navetta Sojuz è decollata dal Kazakistan verso lo spazio. Nella notte la navetta si è agganciata all’ISS e gli astronauti a bordo sono sbarcati sulla stazione pochi minuti dopo le 3.00. Parmitano resterà sulla stazione per circa 6 mesi, dove seguirà circa 150 esperimenti e ad ottobre diventerà capitano della missione Beyond expedition 61.



Che dire… Ci sentiamo presto Capitano con il programma ARISS School Contact!

Restate collegati, a breve più dettagli!


contatto 20 giugno

ARISS school contact planned for Claygate, United Kingdom

As already announced, an International Space Station school contact has been planned for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, United Kingdom. 

The event is planned today
June 20, 2019. It is scheduled to begin at approximately 12.48 UTC, which is 13.48 BST and 14:48 CEST.

The contact will be a direct between NA1SS and GB4RPS. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Moreover, the event will be webcast live at https://live.ariss.org/
Web stream starts 12.00 UTC.

contatto 20 giugno

1.    ARISS school contact for Claygate, UK re-scheduled

The International Space Station school contact for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, United Kingdom, which was planned for Tuesday, has been re-cheduled.

It is now planned for THURSDAY June 20 at 12.48 UTC (14.48 CEST).

The contact will be a direct between NA1SS and GB4RPS. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 

2.    Telebridge contact for Tasmania web streamed

As already announced, an International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with participants at King Island District High School, Currie, TAS, Australia. 

The event is scheduled Wednesday June 19, 2019 to begin at approximately 08:49 UTC, which is 10:49 CEST.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD, located in northern Italy. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 

Moreover, the event will be web streamed on <www.ariotti.com>  starting about 15 min before AOS

contatto 19 giugno

ARISS school contact planned for Tasmania, Australia 

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with participants at King Island District High School, Currie, TAS, Australia. 

The event is planned June 19, 2019. It is scheduled to begin at approximately 08:49 UTC, which is 10:49 CEST.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD, located in northern Italy. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 

School presentation

King Island District High School is located in the Bass Strait off the North West Coast of Tasmania. We cater for approximately 210 students from Kinder to Year 10. Our school is at the heart of our community, we value each student and their family. We have been striving to create resilient, innovative lifelong learners; our school has been on a learning journey with Literacy and Numeracy as our core fundamentals. Our students have the opportunities for on-island and off-island camps from Year 3 and up, we participate in sporting events in mainland Tasmania, we have students from Kinder to Year 10 being able to access specialist Music and Art lessons. We are grateful to have a well resourced MDT room, Computer Lab, kitchen which has then eventuated into a school café ‘The Rock Café’, which offers café style lunches, drinks and monthly dinners to our community giving our students first-hand experience of hospitality. We are also in the process of building our own golf !
hole to fit in with the islands golfing influx of late.  

Students Questions:

1. Brooke:  Why did you become an astronaut?

2. Declan:  What training do you need to be an astronaut to go to space and where did you do your training?

3. Tia:  What sort of food do you eat and how do you determine your meal times in space?

4. Evan:  What do you do in your spare time so you don’t get bored while in space?

5. Molly:  Does it get lonely in space?

6. Katina:  How do you exercise in space?

7. Angus:  How old is the International Space Station and do parts wear out in space like they do on earth?

8. Ameila:  What is your job on the ISS and how do you do it?

9. Carlos:  What are space worms and why are they so important in space?

10. Lawson:  How long does it take to orbit the earth?

11. Caedel:  Have you researched the black hole and if so, how big is it?

12. Angus:  What kind of research do you do?

13. Janelle:  Do you have any advice for any of our students wishing to follow in your career path?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 18 giugno

ARISS school contact planned for Claygate, United Kingdom

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, United Kingdom. 

The events is planned Tuesday June 18, 2019. It is scheduled to begin at approximately 12.51 UTC, which is 14:05 CEST.

The contact will be a direct between NA1SS and GB4RPS. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 

School presentation

Rowan Preparatory School is a vibrant, friendly and nurturing community where girls are encouraged to be themselves. Our school is an independent preparatory school for girls between the ages of 2 to 11, located in the heart of Claygate (near Esher) in Surrey. A school with traditional values and a forward thinking approach to education, we seek to offer a broad and adventurous curriculum full of exciting opportunities.

School life at Rowan is inspiring and offers a breadth of experiences which develop the whole child. The warmth that is evident when you walk through the door at Rowan creates the ideal learning environment for girls to fulfil their potential. They are nurtured and allowed to grow as individuals, encouraged to take risks and have a go at new skills and interests which will enrich their lives. Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths are at the heart of the curriculum at Rowan. Girls make the most of our dedicated specialist teaching spaces and delight in practical learning opportunities in the Engineering and Technology suite. From 3D printers to our radio recording studio, the environment at Rowan is geared towards encouraging creative and exciting learning, ensuring that the girls explore, question and discover in every area of learning. We are passionate about bringing STEM subjects to life and encouraging the girls to see how these subjects translate into the world bey!
ond school. Experiences which will foster successful and inspirational women of the future!

Rowan girls are prepared for the transition to a wide range of successful day and boarding schools and we pride ourselves on finding the right senior school environment for each and every girl. A personalised approach to learning and outstanding pastoral care in our happy environment, ensures that every girl develops a genuine love of learning.

Students Questions:

1. Sophia (Yr 1): How did the International Space Station get built when it just balances in the air?

2. Izzy (Yr 2): What are the challenges to growing food in space if astronauts are to stay in space for longer?

3. Emily (Yr 3): Does your digestion change because in space there is no gravity so your intestine will float in your body?

4. Ashley (Yr 4): Of all the experiments that you have done in space, what has given the most surprising result or has been the most exciting?

5. Alessi (Yr 5): If you spin a ball in the ISS will it keep spinning or will it stop, and if it stops, what stops it?

6. Alannah: (Yr 6): In the future, will it be possible that someone can spend their entire life in space and if so, would their life expectancy change?

7. Grace (Yr 2): If you do a handstand in space does your blood go to your head if there is no gravity?

8. Delilah (Yr 4): Is there anything you could learn about how bacteria and viruses behave in space that could help us defeat infectious bugs around the Earth?

9. Emilia (Yr 5): NASA have said that they will establish a permanent presence on the moon within the next decade, how will they do this and what is the most exciting benefit for human kind?

10. Anya (Yr 6): In all of your time spent on board the ISS, what is the most exciting and extraordinary thing that you have experienced?

11. Sophia saying Zoe’s question (Yr 1): What new information about space are you hoping to learn?

12. Izzy saying Ballie’s question (Yr 2): Can you escape from a black hole?

13. Emily saying Eloise’s question (Yr 3): We have learnt that astronauts are very busy and work long hours. So when you have free time, what do you do for fun?

14. Ashley saying Annabel’s question (Yr 4): How do you get rid of rubbish in space?

15. Alessi saying Sabine’s question (Yr 5): What are you looking forward to the most in nature when you return?

16. Alannah saying Lucy’s question (Yr 6): Our teachers and parents tell us that having a balanced diet is important. Is your diet closely monitored or do you have freedom to choose what you eat? What is your favourite meal?

17. Grace saying Olivia’s question (Yr 1): How do you sleep in space?

18. Delilah saying Amelia’s question (Yr 3): What kind of dangers might you experience in space?

19. Emilia saying Luna’s question (Yr 2): What is the most beautiful thing you can see in space?

20. Anya saying 4J’s question (Yr 4): We have heard that some people don’t believe that the Moon landing took place, what is the best evidence that we have to disprove this theory?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 18 giugno 2019

ARISS school contact planned for Claygate, United Kingdom

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, United Kingdom. 

The events is planned Tuesday June 18, 2019. It is scheduled to begin at approximately 12.51 UTC, which is 14:05 CEST.

The contact will be a direct between NA1SS and GB4RPS. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 


School presentation

Rowan Preparatory School is a vibrant, friendly and nurturing community where girls are encouraged to be themselves. Our school is an independent preparatory school for girls between the ages of 2 to 11, located in the heart of Claygate (near Esher) in Surrey. A school with traditional values and a forward thinking approach to education, we seek to offer a broad and adventurous curriculum full of exciting opportunities.

School life at Rowan is inspiring and offers a breadth of experiences which develop the whole child. The warmth that is evident when you walk through the door at Rowan creates the ideal learning environment for girls to fulfil their potential. They are nurtured and allowed to grow as individuals, encouraged to take risks and have a go at new skills and interests which will enrich their lives. Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths are at the heart of the curriculum at Rowan. Girls make the most of our dedicated specialist teaching spaces and delight in practical learning opportunities in the Engineering and Technology suite. From 3D printers to our radio recording studio, the environment at Rowan is geared towards encouraging creative and exciting learning, ensuring that the girls explore, question and discover in every area of learning. We are passionate about bringing STEM subjects to life and encouraging the girls to see how these subjects translate into the world bey!
ond school. Experiences which will foster successful and inspirational women of the future!

Rowan girls are prepared for the transition to a wide range of successful day and boarding schools and we pride ourselves on finding the right senior school environment for each and every girl. A personalised approach to learning and outstanding pastoral care in our happy environment, ensures that every girl develops a genuine love of learning.


Students Questions:

1. Sophia (Yr 1): How did the International Space Station get built when it just balances in the air?

2. Izzy (Yr 2): What are the challenges to growing food in space if astronauts are to stay in space for longer?

3. Emily (Yr 3): Does your digestion change because in space there is no gravity so your intestine will float in your body?

4. Ashley (Yr 4): Of all the experiments that you have done in space, what has given the most surprising result or has been the most exciting?

5. Alessi (Yr 5): If you spin a ball in the ISS will it keep spinning or will it stop, and if it stops, what stops it?

6. Alannah: (Yr 6): In the future, will it be possible that someone can spend their entire life in space and if so, would their life expectancy change?

7. Grace (Yr 2): If you do a handstand in space does your blood go to your head if there is no gravity?

8. Delilah (Yr 4): Is there anything you could learn about how bacteria and viruses behave in space that could help us defeat infectious bugs around the Earth?

9. Emilia (Yr 5): NASA have said that they will establish a permanent presence on the moon within the next decade, how will they do this and what is the most exciting benefit for human kind?

10. Anya (Yr 6): In all of your time spent on board the ISS, what is the most exciting and extraordinary thing that you have experienced?

11. Sophia saying Zoe’s question (Yr 1): What new information about space are you hoping to learn?

12. Izzy saying Ballie’s question (Yr 2): Can you escape from a black hole?

13. Emily saying Eloise’s question (Yr 3): We have learnt that astronauts are very busy and work long hours. So when you have free time, what do you do for fun?

14. Ashley saying Annabel’s question (Yr 4): How do you get rid of rubbish in space?

15. Alessi saying Sabine’s question (Yr 5): What are you looking forward to the most in nature when you return?

16. Alannah saying Lucy’s question (Yr 6): Our teachers and parents tell us that having a balanced diet is important. Is your diet closely monitored or do you have freedom to choose what you eat? What is your favourite meal?

17. Grace saying Olivia’s question (Yr 1): How do you sleep in space?

18. Delilah saying Amelia’s question (Yr 3): What kind of dangers might you experience in space?

19. Emilia saying Luna’s question (Yr 2): What is the most beautiful thing you can see in space?

20. Anya saying 4J’s question (Yr 4): We have heard that some people don’t believe that the Moon landing took place, what is the best evidence that we have to disprove this theory?




About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatti del prossimo anno all’interno della missione Beyond con Luca Parmitano

A questo link si trova il decreto 295\2019 dell’ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) con la graduatoria delle scuole italiane accettate nell’ambito della missione Beyond che parleranno con Luca Parmitano tra  2019 e 2020:

 
 
E con un punteggio di 16 nella graduatoria dei collegamenti diretti ci siamo anche noi, con una proposta educativa in collaborazione con l’Istituto Comprensivo Don Milani di Monza,
 
A breve più notizie a riguardo
 
Stay tuned!
 

contatto 8 giugno 2019


ARISS school contact planned for Olomouc, Czech Republic

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at House of Children and Youth, Olomouc, Czech Republic. The event is planned Saturday June 8, 2019.

The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 13:05 UTC, which is 15:05 CEST.

The contact will be a direct between OR4ISS and OK2KWX, located in Czech Republic. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz

Moreover, the event will be webcast on:
https://www.youtube.com/user/HUHUCOCTAILcz/live


School presentation

Dum diti a mladeze Olomouc (eng.: House of Children and Youth, abbr. DDM Olomouc) – a leisure time center which operates in 5 buildings, whereas four are situated in Olomouc. Since April 2001 the DDM is constituted by Olomouc Regional Authority. For the whole public DDM offered both regular clubs and interest groups as well as occasional and stay events.

Over 150 interest groups started to work every year, regularly – once, twice or three times a week – attended by 2602 children and youth at the age from 3 to 25 years only during the last school year (2017/2018). These activities were provided by 150 employees, external and voluntary workers.

During the summer holidays, DDM Olomouc organized more than 30 summer camps for almost 800 children. In summer furthermore, as during the whole year, DDM Olomouc offers cheap accommodation both right in Olomouc and in Ochoz u Konice both locations are up to 30 km away from Olomouc.


Students Questions:

1. Jakub (13):  How many solar panels are powering the entire station and do you have any other power sources?

2. Jonas (11):  What voltage are your instruments using aboard the ISS?

3. Jan (14):  What would you tell the people who believe that the Earth is flat?

4. Filip (12):  How often do you check the social networks and have you any time to watch Youtube?

5. Anna (11):  Did the ASTROBEEs already arrive and do you use them already?

6. Michal (15):  How far from the station can you go and can you move outside untethered?

7. Ales (13):  How long does it take to get from Earth to the ISS?

8. Simon (11):  What does being in a spacesuit feel like and what is the outside temperature?

9. Antonin (14):  How long do the spacesuit’s energy and oxygen supplies last?

10. Jiri (12):  Do you feel any changes to your muscular system during your mission, or is it a bit of a shock after your return back to Earth?

11. Johana (11):  Do you need to strap in when you sleep and how do you enjoy sleeping in zero gravity?

12. Tomas (11):  How often do you eat and do you enjoy the taste of the food?

13. Jan Se. (15):  Have you experienced any accidents while on the station, for example, a device failure?

14. Jan St. (15):  How do you fight a fire if it breaks out onboard the ISS?

15. Michael (12):  How much waste is generated on the ISS and what are you doing with it?

16. Franta (12):  Can you play any computer games and how much free time do you have?

17. Ondrej (15):  What does it feel like to fly a rocket up into space?

18. Vaclav (13):  How much time do you spend exercising each day?

19. Max (14):  How would you deal with a serious injury, for example, hand fracture?

20. Matej (11):  How and how often do you communicate with your family?


About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 8 giugno 2019



ARISS school contact planned for Olomouc, Czech Republic

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at House of Children and Youth, Olomouc, Czech Republic. The event is planned Saturday June 8, 2019.

The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 13:05 UTC, which is 15:05 CEST.

The contact will be a direct between OR4ISS and OK2KWX, located in Czech Republic. The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz 

Moreover, the event will be webcast on:
https://www.youtube.com/user/HUHUCOCTAILcz/live


School presentation

Dum diti a mladeze Olomouc (eng.: House of Children and Youth, abbr. DDM Olomouc) – a leisure time center which operates in 5 buildings, whereas four are situated in Olomouc. Since April 2001 the DDM is constituted by Olomouc Regional Authority. For the whole public DDM offered both regular clubs and interest groups as well as occasional and stay events.

Over 150 interest groups started to work every year, regularly – once, twice or three times a week – attended by 2602 children and youth at the age from 3 to 25 years only during the last school year (2017/2018). These activities were provided by 150 employees, external and voluntary workers.

During the summer holidays, DDM Olomouc organized more than 30 summer camps for almost 800 children. In summer furthermore, as during the whole year, DDM Olomouc offers cheap accommodation both right in Olomouc and in Ochoz u Konice both locations are up to 30 km away from Olomouc.


Students Questions:

1. Jakub (13):  How many solar panels are powering the entire station and do you have any other power sources?

2. Jonas (11):  What voltage are your instruments using aboard the ISS?

3. Jan (14):  What would you tell the people who believe that the Earth is flat?

4. Filip (12):  How often do you check the social networks and have you any time to watch Youtube?

5. Anna (11):  Did the ASTROBEEs already arrive and do you use them already?

6. Michal (15):  How far from the station can you go and can you move outside untethered?

7. Ales (13):  How long does it take to get from Earth to the ISS?

8. Simon (11):  What does being in a spacesuit feel like and what is the outside temperature?

9. Antonin (14):  How long do the spacesuit’s energy and oxygen supplies last?

10. Jiri (12):  Do you feel any changes to your muscular system during your mission, or is it a bit of a shock after your return back to Earth?

11. Johana (11):  Do you need to strap in when you sleep and how do you enjoy sleeping in zero gravity?

12. Tomas (11):  How often do you eat and do you enjoy the taste of the food?

13. Jan Se. (15):  Have you experienced any accidents while on the station, for example, a device failure?

14. Jan St. (15):  How do you fight a fire if it breaks out onboard the ISS?

15. Michael (12):  How much waste is generated on the ISS and what are you doing with it?

16. Franta (12):  Can you play any computer games and how much free time do you have?

17. Ondrej (15):  What does it feel like to fly a rocket up into space?

18. Vaclav (13):  How much time do you spend exercising each day?

19. Max (14):  How would you deal with a serious injury, for example, hand fracture?

20. Matej (11):  How and how often do you communicate with your family?


About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 6 giugno 2019 (aggiornato)


ARISS school contact for Port Henry, USA  –  MODIFIED

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with participants at Moriah Central School, Port Henry, NY USA. The event is presently scheduled Thursday June 6, 2019 

The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 16:54 UTC, which is 18:54 CEST.

The contact will be a telebridge between OR4ISS and VK6MJ located in Australia. The downlink signals will NOT be audible in Europe, but the event will be web cast on:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nr8kPVKzU94