Tutti gli articoli di Stefania Raveane

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Several upcoming ARISS events:
ARISS-Russia, in collaboration with the Southwest State University in Kursk, Russia, are developing a series of educational CubeSat satellites called Tanusha. Two Tanusha CubeSats were developed by students at Southwest State University and were hand-deployed by cosmonauts during an August 2017 extravehicular activity. These two CubeSats are performing cluster flight experiments through communications links. A second set of CubeSats, Tanusha 3 & 4 were launched earlier this year and are currently on-board ISS. Tanusha 3 & 4 are planned to be hand deployed by Cosmonauts in August. They will perform even more comprehensive cluster flight objectives than Tanusha 1 & 2.
On June 20, Tanusha 3 will be connected to one of the ARISS Service Module antennas and will transmit from 0730-1200 UTC on 437.05 MHz. These FM transmissions will include greetings from students in several languages, including Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese. On June 21, Tanusha 4 will be connected to one of the ARISS Service Module antennas and will transmit from 0730-1200 UTC on the same frequency: 437.05 MHz. The ARISS-Russia team plan to also retransmit these signals on the standard ARISS 2-meter downlink, 145.80 MHz using the JVC Kenwood D700 radio that is still on-board ISS. All are invited to listen to the CubeSats from ISS on 437.05 and/or 145.80 MHz.
The next SSTV image downlinks are planned for June 29-July 1. These images will commemorate the various satellites that the ARISS team has developed and hand-deployed from the ISS. These will include the first satellite deployment from ISS: SuitSat-1/Radioskaf-1 which was deployed in February 2006. More details on this will be forthcoming as the date draws near.
We thank ARISS-Russia delegate Sergey Samburov, RV3DR for this latest information.

ham video

Ham Video transmitter defective
Mid April, the Ham Video transmitter onboard Columbus stopped working.
June 1st 2018, an extensive test was performed by crew. This test comprized connecting the transmitter to the second ARISS L/S-band patch antenna on the nadir of Columbus.
The test was negative. Ground stations didn’t receive any signal from Ham Video.
Presently, ARISS is planning to download the transmitter for repair. Onboard, repair is impossible.
We hope this plan will be accepted by the space agencies and the cost of operations funded by sponsors.
Schools and crewmembers performing educational ARISS school contacts are delighted to use Ham Video. We will do the best we can to restart this service as soon as possible.
We will keep you informed

19 giugno 18

ARISS contact planned for school in Serbia

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Tehnicka Skola Zajecar, Zajecar, Serbia.

The event is scheduled Tuesday 19 June 2018 at approximately 14.20 UTC.  

The contact will be a direct operated by YU1ACR.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe.

School Information:

Technical school from Zajecar is a secondary vocational school in Eastern Serbia. The school includes educational profiles in the fields of electrical engineering, transport, mechanical engineering and information technology. For years, the school has been involved in various reform projects secondary vocational education, which resulted in the introduction of new experimental educational profiles mechatronics and information technologies.

An important segment in the school is non-formal education and work in the sections. In the field of robotics, our students record excellent results at national competitions. In 2017, the school launched a state-level “ARDUINO KUP” competition where students displayed their skills in the field of microcontrollers. The competition was organized in 2018, and we hope that the competition will soon take on an international character.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Do you play any sport on the ISS?
2. How much do you sleep?
3. How many days you can spend on the ISS in a row?
4. How do you feel when you return from ISS to the Earth?
5. Do everyone sleep at the same time?
6. Do you eat only prepared food or you can cook something?
7. How often are you in contact with your family on Earth?
8. What was your most interesting experience on ISS?
9. Can you have any allergic reactions on ISS?
10. How to go to the toilet on ISS?
11. How many work hours do you have a day?
12. Did you ever get sick during your stay at the ISS?
13. Are you sweating during your stay at the ISS?
14. What fun activities do you do in space? 
15. Do you wear ordinary or special clothes?
16. What is the experience when during the spacewalk?
17. What do you miss the most during your stay at the ISS?
18. Does the ISS make noise?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

1 giugno 2018 prova HamVideo

Ham Video Transmitter Test

Since mid April, the HamVideo transmitter onboard Columbus is not working.

Friday June 1, 2018 the Ham Video system will be tested. 
The transmitter will be down powered step by step.
Next the antenna cable will be connected to the second S-band antenna.
Finally, the transmitter will be powered on step by step.

These operations, to be performed by crew, are scheduled 17.25 – 17.55 UTC.

The ISS will pass over Europe 45 minutes later, at 18.40 UTC.
Ground stations are invited to monitor the signal and report.

Interested parties can monitor the test by connecting to:

https://live.ariss.org/hamtv/

We are looking forward to this test, hoping that the transmitter will start working again.

contatto 23 maggio 2018

ARISS contact planned for school in Poland

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Janusz Kusocinski Primary School No. 71, Poznan, Poland.

The event is scheduled Wednesday 23 May 2018 at approximately 11:06 UTC.  

The contact will be a telebridge operated by W6SRJ, located in California, USA.

The event will be webcast on:
https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/live/

School Information:

Szkola Podstawowa nr 71 im. Janusza Kusocinskiego in Poznan, Poland, is a 60-year old public primary school for students aged 6-15. Starting with the school year 2017/18, primary schools in Poland were extended from six to eight years so at present the school has 460 pupils in grades 1 to 7. 

The school is situated in the centre of one of Poland’s greatest cities.  A university, cultural and economic centre boasting a one thousand-year-old history, Poznan offers its inhabitants and visitors myriad educational opportunities of which the school takes full advantage.

The school nurtures curiosity and creativity through an inspiring, broad and engaging curriculum. Thanks to a variety of educational programmes (e.g., Odyssey of the Mind, eTwinning, European Christmas Tree Decoration Exchange, etc.), the school offers its students opportunities for learning and development ‘without borders’ by which they will be enabled and empowered to attain their full potential and become competent in shaping their own future. The school puts great emphasis on STEAM activities. In the school year 2016/2017, the school piloted the ‘Mission X. Train like an astronaut’ educational programme in Poland and since then have been the centre for the programme in Poland. Despite their young age, the students attend lectures and workshops at best universities in Poland or give lectures at international student conferences. During the preparation period for the ARISS contact, the school cooperated with a local amateur radio club (SP3YOR) and plans have been !
made to establish an amateur radio club at school. The school takes part in various activities within the local community, cooperating with governmental institutions and NGO organisations. Szkola Podstawowa nr 71 im. Janusza Kusocinskiego in Poznan takes pride in its tradition of voluntary work. Every year, the school becomes the local Collection-Centre for Wielka Orkiestra Świątecznej Pomocy (The Great Orchestra of Christmas Charity), the biggest, non-governmental, non-profit, charity organisation in Poland, which aims to support health care in Poland.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Zofia O. (11): What was your path to becoming an astronaut?

2. Zofia R. (13): What research conducted currently on the ISS has been specifically undertaken in preparation for the human exploration of destinations beyond low-Earth orbit?

3. Anna (12): If you had a chance to travel beyond our Solar System to find a new habitable planet for humans would you do it even if you knew you may never return to the Earth?

4. Samira (13): Does your being in space affect your general perspective on life?

5. Jakub G.(13): What surprised you most in space?

6. Justyna (10): What happens when you get ill on the ISS?

7. Sandra (12): How does your ordinary day in life aboard the ISS look like?

8. Krzysztof (12):  For an experienced astronaut as you are, which is the best space movie and which is the worst?

9. Igor (13): Has anything dangerous ever happened to you?

10. Dariusz (13): How do you get drinking water on the ISS?

11. Jakub Z. (13): What do you miss most?

12. Antoni (13): How do astronauts eat aboard the ISS?

13. Eliza (12): Where does a compass point to in space?

14. Aleksandra (13): How does taking care of personal hygiene differ from maintaining hygiene on Earth?

15. Zuzanna (13): Do you ever feel collision with any objects or space debris?

16. Artur (13): Do you do anything just for fun on the ISS?

17. Mateusz (13) Is there anything you would like to do right now, although you know that you cannot?

18. Kewin (13): How and where do you sleep?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 26 Aprile

ARISS contact planned for three schools in Poland

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Zespol Szkoly Podstawowej i Publicznego Gimnazjum w Buczku, Buczek; I Liceum Ogolnoksztacace im. Tadeusza Kosciuszki w  Lasku, Lask; Zespol Szkol Ponadgimnazjalnych w Zelowie, Zelow, Poland.

The event is scheduled on  Thursday 26 April 2018 at approximately 10.52 UTC.  

The contact will be a direct operated by SP7KYL.

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:

Three schools participate in one ARISS school contact. The Complex of High Schools in Zelow and The 1st High School in Lask were invited to cooperate with the main organizer of the event: The Complex of the Primary School and the Junior High School in Buczek, because students from one school very often continue their education in another school on the next educational level. 

These three schools are an example of education levels in Poland. They are situated in the central part of Poland. The Complex of the Primary School and the Junior High School (Zespol Szkoly Podstawowej i Publicznego Gimnazjum) in Buczek is a primary school together with a secondary school. Since 2016 the school has been changed into one Primary School. It is a community school located in the center of Poland. The school was built in 1950, there are 18 classrooms, 2 IT rooms, a canteen, two ordinary gym rooms and one newly constructed modern gym. There are 369 students at school and highly educated staff. The school is known for its safety, warmth, friendship and working together. Zelow is located about 6 km from Buczek. 

The Complex of High Schools (Zespol Szkol Ogolnoksztalacych ) in Zelow consists of the primary school, junior school, and secondary school. The secondary school was built in 1957, whereas in 1999 the Complex of schools have been established. There are 23 classrooms, modern library assembly hall, gym, sports ground and observatory equipped with the camera registering bolides and transferring the data to the Polish Bolides Net. 363 students attend our school. The school is famous for realizing various projects and cooperation with different organizations, i.e. Amnesty International. Since 2017 teachers and students have been participating in the program Erasmus.

Lask is located about 10km from Buczek and about 15km from Zelow. The 1st High School (I Liceum Ogolnoksztalcące im. Tadeusza Kosciuszki) in Lask is the oldest Polish secondary school in this city. It is an outstanding didactic institution which has been sustaining the highest level of education as well as the place of particular aura, where all the graduates have been talking with pleasure and sentiment about. Having worked for years with the original methods with talented students has contributed to the high place of our school in the national school rankings. This success is owed to the plenty of students who have won diverse contests in different subjects. Graduated students continue higher education studying. 

The Amateur Radio Club SP7KYL is Association of Communication Section of Sport and Recreation JUPITER of Belchatow Power Plant. The Club unites 10 actively working licensed amateurs radio members. The club was founded in 1980. The Club launched and take care of two amateur radio analogous repeaters SR7E (2m) and SR7EB (70cm). The club is also co-organizer of national HAM radio technical meetings: SP-QRP Workshops (2007-2011) and The Technical Shortwave Convent (Zjazd Techniczny Krotkofalowcow) in Burzenin (since 2012). Members from this clubs visited and installed HAM radio equipment in each of mentioned schools to give their students a unique opportunity to talk by HAM radio.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Alicja (15, B):  What was the most interesting occurrence that you came across during your space trip and at the space station? 

2. Piotr (17, Z):  What are scientific experiments carried out on the space station at present? 

3. Joanna (18, L):  Can you describe how did the aurora looked like from the ISS and what did you feel when you saw it the first time? 

4. Bartosz (15, B):  Does being in space contribute to a faster aging of cells? 

5. Magdalena (14, Z):  What do astronauts feel while approaching earth during the return? 

6. Mateusz (18, L):  What do you think about the importance of a HAM radio school contacts? 

7. Patrycja (15, B):  How do astronauts weld metals while repairing broken ISS station? 

8. Jakub (16, Z):  How do you keep in touch with your family? 

9. Agnieszka (17, L):  What do you do on the International Space Station if one of you gets ill and, for example, needs to have an immediate surgical removal of an appendix? 

10. Blazej (15, B):  How often do you have to correct the ISS orbit to avoid space trash? 

11. Nikola (16, Z):  Which skills are the most important to become an astronaut? 

12. Remigiusz (17, L):  Is it hard to get used to weightlessness? 

13. Lukasz (14, B):  What is your biggest dislike being in space? 

14. Bartlomiej (15, Z):  How well does your training help you to cope with the mental and physical changes that occur on travel to and from space? 

15. Dominik (17, L):  What is the maximum duration that your mission in space can be? 

Where:
B stands for General Education School Complex in Buczek 
L stands for Ist Secondary School in Lask 
Z stands for General Education School Complex In Zelow

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 19 aprile 2018

start: ARISS contact planned for school in Warwick, UK

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Kings High School, Warwick, UK.

The event is scheduled on Thursday 19 April 2018 at approximately 12.05 UTC.  

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KHS.

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

Moreover, the event will be webcast real time:

1100 UTC : Web stream to start.  The school will welcome everyone, including those on the stream and will proceed into the presentations from the students on their activities that have led up to the contact itself.

1145 UTC : ARISS Operations UK will take over and provide the context for the contact itself.

1205 UTC : ARISS Contact with Ricky Arnold.

1215 UTC : ARISS contact concludes and final address from the school.
The web stream will be available on https://live.ariss.org

School Information:

The Mars story of the school

The Mars project, envisioned by a student after watching Tim Peake’s 2016 mission, is our chance to inspire more girls while in their formative years, to consider studying science at A level and beyond.

Since 1879 King’s High Warwick has been championing girls in science and STEM subjects as one of the leading all-girls schools in the Midlands. The importance of girls’ education back then was viewed as inferior to that of boys and the early headmistresses of King’s set about trying to change that. Over a hundred years on girls and boy’s education is viewed as equal, however the number of girls in science and STEM subjects is still not equal to our male counterparts; through school and into the workplace. Just 35% of girls choose maths, physics and computing compared to 94% of boys

The Project One campus is the latest opportunity for King’s girls, consisting of brand new school buildings on the Warwick School site. It will feature state of the art science labs, enabling future generations of girls to study with the best facilities possible. The future King’s girls at the Prep and local schools will use these labs for their time at King’s and we believe the Mars Project will inspire them to see what studying STEM can lead to, helped by access to high quality equipment. The project will assist in creating a collaborative relationship between the wide variety of subjects that have previously had minimal cross over in their syllabuses. The focus on Mars and astronomy links directly to the A Level Physics syllabus, inspiring more girls to study physics beyond GCSE. The supra-curricula activities conducted as a part of the project, such as building rovers in DT widen the educational experience of girls and enable them to see the real-life applications !
of their learning.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. (Eleanor G, Yr12): When we colonize Mars, what is the most important thing we need to learn from our ancestors’ mistakes on Earth?

2. (Florence J, Yr 4): What types of weather can you get on Mars that we would have to tackle if humans were going to live there?

3. (Shubhangi B, Yr12): Considering the research into life support systems on the ISS and research into in-situ resource utilization, how long after the first manned mission to Mars do you think that a Mars colony can be self-sufficient?

4. (Gigi T, Yr9): Now that you are on the ISS would you have done anything differently during training, physically or mentally?

5. (Emma W, Yr12): Having experienced the vastness of space, do you believe there are other forms of life in the universe?

6. (Maddy S-L, Yr11): How has your journey to space changed your perspective on human life?

7. (Imogen M, Yr11): What aspect of space travel do you think needs to be improved in the next 10 years to get us further into space?

8. (Evey H, Yr12): What is the most magnificent place on Earth from space?

9. (Rosie S, Yr7): How does not having daylight or seasons in space affect you compared to being on Earth?

10. (Olivia L, Yr6): Is it true that the atmosphere changes your sense of taste up in space?

11. (Shivanshi B, Yr9): How does the feeling of weightlessness compare to the training underwater on Earth?

12. (Martha F, Yr10): How far into the future is the technology needed to make travelling between solar systems the norm?

13. (Olivia B, Yr11): We all know space can be a dangerous environment. How do you and your fellow astronauts protect yourselves whilst on the ISS?

14. (Emma C, Yr11): What does your training on Earth entail to help you cope with the effects of the lack of gravity on your sleep?

15. (Emma R, Yr9): What part of nature do you miss most from Earth when you are in space?

16. (Holly S, Yr10): How difficult is it for your body to adjust to life in space?

17. (Amy P, Yr9): What’s the one thing that surprised you most when you first saw Earth from space?

18. (Jade B, Yr11): What’s your advice to young people dreaming of becoming involved in space programs?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

Contatto: 27 Marzo 2018

start: ARISS contact planned for schools in Freeport, NY, USA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with  Freeport Public Schools, Freeport, NY, USA.

The event is scheduled on Tuesday 27 March 2018 at approximately 17.41 UTC.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD in Northern Italy.
The downlink should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink.

School Information:
Freeport Public Schools is located in the city of Freeport, about 25 miles east of New York City. The district is composed of 8 schools—one pre-K school, four elementary schools, one intermediate middle school, one middle school, and one high school. The total student enrollment is 7,400 and 90% of the students are Hispanic or African-American. Science is taught in all grades, and at the high school students enroll in Advanced Placement classes in physics (calculus and non-calculus based), chemistry, biology, and environmental science. We also have a research class in each of the grades 7-12 that is open to all students.

Our students have participated in the International Astronomical Search Campaign to confirm or discover asteroids that exist in the asteroid belt. We confirmed the discovery of two asteroids, received two plaques from NASA and then published a paper on our work in a leading physics educational journal. One of our teachers and his students travelled to California Institute of Technology to take part in NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. One of the students who participated in this research program is now majoring in astrophysics.

Our students have been preparing for our conversation with Scott Tingle from early last summer. This unique opportunity to speak and observe Scott in the International Space Station has generated tremendous enthusiasm for science among our students. Going forward, we plan to design an experiment that can be conducted in the Space Station. At some point in the future we would also like to invite Mr. Tingle to come to our school and give a science seminar.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Lesley (15): If an astronaut gets a bacterial infection, do antibiotics work in space as they do on Earth?

2. Jayden (13): Could you describe the ‘SUPVIS Justin’ experiment you conducted on March 2 and the next steps in this work

3. Sarah (12): How has your perspective about the Earth changed as a result of your trip to the Space Station?

4. Jonavan (10): What are the duties of a typical astronaut on his/her first day in space?

5. Johan (10): Does the immune system become impaired after a prolonged stay in space?

6. Gabriela (10): What does it look like from space when seasons are changing?

7. Ava (10): How does age effect how the body reacts in space?

8. Giovanni (12): What are the uses of the robotic arm?

9. Brenna (14): You plan to do one or more spacewalks in your trip aboard the ISS. Could you describe the biggest challenge you face in such missions?

10. Adisa (16): How often and how does ISS adjust its trajectory to maintain a constant orbit?

11. Lesley (15): If astronauts leave the Earth at around 17,000 mph why does it take so long to reach the ISS located approximately 250 miles above the Earth?

12. Jayden (13): I know you like fluid mechanics. Could you describe the fluid mechanics experiments you are involved in?

13. Sarah (12): Has the ISS National Laboratory found any possible organisms that can survive the harsh conditions of space for a prolonged period of time?

14. Jonavan (10): What would happen if you got sick in space?

15. Johan (10): You will be doing a number of experiments aboard the ISS. Could you describe one that interests you the most?

16. Gabriela (10): How can we help pets to survive in outer space for longer periods of time?

17. Ava (10): What are the effects of blood rushing to astronauts’ heads in a microgravity environment?

18. Giovanni (12): You were one of the first responders in the September 2001 terrorist attacks. Could you describe your role?

19. Brenna (14): Knowing there is debris in space can you describe briefly how ISS detects objects moving toward the station?

20. Adisa (16): Due to varying laws governing research in various countries, does each country work solely on their own project or are projects codependent?

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

 

contatto 21 febbraio

ARISS contact planned for school in Portugal

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Agrupamento de Escolas do Fundao, Fundao, Portugal

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 21 February 2018 at approximately 9.38 UTC.   

The contact will be a direct operated by CS5DBB

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:

The school is located in Fundao, in the mainland Portugal Centre Region.  This town, of approx. 9000 inhabitants, has grown in a fertile valley between the Gardunha and Estrela mountains and is located about 252 km from Lisbon and Oporto, 200 km from Coimbra and a few kilometers from the Spanish border. This is a region especially devoted to agriculture.  There are also a few industries and services and an important university nearby. Olive oil, wine, and cheese are well-known products of this region, together with an increasing and important cherry production that puts Portugal in a pleasant place in the exportation rankings. The highest place in mainland Portugal is located in the neighborhood the Estrela mountain (1997 mts.) which brings an important number of visitors especially during the snow season.

In June 2012, the school has become an aggregation of several schools for students aged 3-18 which has enlarged the institution. There are 1573 students and 176 teachers. The school has a large variety of student profiles as well as families. Pupils start here the kindergarten until they complete the secondary education, which means it offers an educational project during 12 years. Besides the basic 3 cycles of studies, a wide amount of courses in the secondary education are offered. The secondary regular courses vary from Sciences and Technologies, Economics to Visual Arts and Humanities. There is also an offer of vocational courses.

Some students are taking part in the 2018 European CanSat Competition of the European Space Agency (ESA). A CanSat is a simulation of a real satellite, integrated within the volume and shape of a soft drink can.  Last year, they also participated in the European Astro Pi Challenge which is a project by the ESA Education Office, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, offering primary and secondary school students the amazing opportunity to run scientific investigations on the International Space Station (ISS) by means of computer coding.

The Rede dos Emissores Portugueses (REP) was founded in 1926. The REP, as national member society, represents Portugal in the IARU since 1931.  The REP headquarters is located in Lisbon, however, there are numbers of HAM radio clubs in different regions of Portugal. The REP Delegacao da Beira Baixa CS5DBB is a delegation of the National Club REP and collaborates with the school in educational and technical preparations for the direct ARISS school contact and other projects.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Beatriz (16): What kind of food do you eat on the ISS?

2. Marco (16): What was the daily routine that took you the longest to get used to on the ISS?

3. Joao (16): What do you do in case of a fire on the station?

4. Pedro P. (16): How long did you take to get used to living in low gravity conditions?

5. Pedro B. (16): What kind of scientific experiments can you do in space and not on Earth?

6. Rodrigo (16): What is the most lifelike science fiction movie that you have ever seen?

7. Mariana (16): In which direction do plants grow aboard the International Space Station?

8. Joana (16): What did you feel during the launch?

9. Catarina (16): Do you have to wear any special type of clothes on the ISS?

10. Afonso (16): What do you have to do if someone gets the ISS dirty by, for example, puking on it?

11. Andre (15): What are you doing in your free time to have fun?

12. Diogo (15): What was the hardest experience you ever had on the ISS?

13. Alexandra (16): What kind of physical and psychological preparations did you need to be an astronaut?

14. Rute (15): What did you feel when you saw the Earth from the ISS for the first time?

15. Carmo (16): What do you miss the most when you are staying in the ISS?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 21 febbraio 2018

ARISS contact planned for school in Portugal

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Agrupamento de Escolas do Fundao, Fundao, Portugal

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 21 February 2018 at approximately 9.38 UTC.   

The contact will be a direct operated by CS5DBB

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:

The school is located in Fundao, in the mainland Portugal Centre Region.  This town, of approx. 9000 inhabitants, has grown in a fertile valley between the Gardunha and Estrela mountains and is located about 252 km from Lisbon and Oporto, 200 km from Coimbra and a few kilometers from the Spanish border. This is a region especially devoted to agriculture.  There are also a few industries and services and an important university nearby. Olive oil, wine, and cheese are well-known products of this region, together with an increasing and important cherry production that puts Portugal in a pleasant place in the exportation rankings. The highest place in mainland Portugal is located in the neighborhood the Estrela mountain (1997 mts.) which brings an important number of visitors especially during the snow season.

In June 2012, the school has become an aggregation of several schools for students aged 3-18 which has enlarged the institution. There are 1573 students and 176 teachers. The school has a large variety of student profiles as well as families. Pupils start here the kindergarten until they complete the secondary education, which means it offers an educational project during 12 years. Besides the basic 3 cycles of studies, a wide amount of courses in the secondary education are offered. The secondary regular courses vary from Sciences and Technologies, Economics to Visual Arts and Humanities. There is also an offer of vocational courses.

Some students are taking part in the 2018 European CanSat Competition of the European Space Agency (ESA). A CanSat is a simulation of a real satellite, integrated within the volume and shape of a soft drink can.  Last year, they also participated in the European Astro Pi Challenge which is a project by the ESA Education Office, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, offering primary and secondary school students the amazing opportunity to run scientific investigations on the International Space Station (ISS) by means of computer coding.

The Rede dos Emissores Portugueses (REP) was founded in 1926. The REP, as national member society, represents Portugal in the IARU since 1931.  The REP headquarters is located in Lisbon, however, there are numbers of HAM radio clubs in different regions of Portugal. The REP Delegacao da Beira Baixa CS5DBB is a delegation of the National Club REP and collaborates with the school in educational and technical preparations for the direct ARISS school contact and other projects.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Beatriz (16): What kind of food do you eat on the ISS?

2. Marco (16): What was the daily routine that took you the longest to get used to on the ISS?

3. Joao (16): What do you do in case of a fire on the station?

4. Pedro P. (16): How long did you take to get used to living in low gravity conditions?

5. Pedro B. (16): What kind of scientific experiments can you do in space and not on Earth?

6. Rodrigo (16): What is the most lifelike science fiction movie that you have ever seen?

7. Mariana (16): In which direction do plants grow aboard the International Space Station?

8. Joana (16): What did you feel during the launch?

9. Catarina (16): Do you have to wear any special type of clothes on the ISS?

10. Afonso (16): What do you have to do if someone gets the ISS dirty by, for example, puking on it?

11. Andre (15): What are you doing in your free time to have fun?

12. Diogo (15): What was the hardest experience you ever had on the ISS?

13. Alexandra (16): What kind of physical and psychological preparations did you need to be an astronaut?

14. Rute (15): What did you feel when you saw the Earth from the ISS for the first time?

15. Carmo (16): What do you miss the most when you are staying in the ISS?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters interest in science, technology, and learning.