Archivi categoria: ARISS

Categoria utilizzata per l’invio tramite email degli annunci di contatto della ISS

contatto 14 Dicembre 2018

ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Serena Aunon-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

The event is scheduled Friday 14 December 2018 at approximately 12:55 UTC (13:55 CEWT).

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

School Information:

Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year’s GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood – Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that “space” smells very metallic.  Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station.  What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you’re moving when you’re on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What’s your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

10 Dicembre 2018

start:

ARISS contact planned for students in Thiviers, France

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Serena Aunon-Chancellor KG5TMT with Collège Léonce Bourliaguet, Thiviers, France. 

The event is scheduled Monday 10 December 2018 at approximately 13:12 UTC (14:12CEWT). 

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by F5KEM.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Location Information:

Due to its geographical location, Thiviers has always had a commercial vocation, and the reputation of its agricultural products has largely contributed to its expansion.
As a medieval fortified town, Thiviers was always coveted for its strategic position, Thiviers was even many times destroyed, the town has been rebuilt again and again with the passage of history.
Thiviers is a place of pilgrimage on the way to Santiago de Compostela.
In the middle of the 18th century, for more than 174 years, Thiviers was an important place for earthenware. The small dynamic town of about 3000 inhabitants is famous for its many fairs and markets, including the Goose and the Duck in winter. The fairs of Thiviers were already known in the 15th century. In 1962, the city organized the first award-winning fair in the Dordogne, allowing it to obtain a label for its greasy markets and to be proclaimed “Capital of Foie Gras in Périgord”. 
Ensuring the natural transition between the Limousin in the North and the great province of Aquitaine in the South, Thiviers is a gateway to the South of the Regional Natural Park Perigord-Limousin. Its geographical position is remarkable, on the RN21. On the other hand, its rail passenger and goods traffic ensures a continuous and ever increasing activity towards major centers. Several companies are located in Thiviers, “ARCADIE Sud Ouest” the Thiviers slaughterhouse and the Thiviers quarries are the two main ones. 

School Information:

Located in a small town in a rural area, between Limoges and Perigueux, the College Leonce Bourliaguet hosts about 360 students between 11 and 15 years old.Leonce Bourliaguet was an imaginative and prolific author for the youth, born in Thiviers in 1895.
Besides the usual subjects (French, Maths, English, Spanish, History and Geography, P.E., Science, Music, Technology, Art), some of them have the opportunity, if they wish, to follow an artistic education (dance, music), a sport option (basketball) or a scientific option.
In this scientific option, the students have been working for several years on different themes related to space and astronomy. They join in different events such as the yearly Science Festival or scientific contests. Last year, they were among the French schools selected to work with the ISS.

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Etienne (10): What was the first thing you did aboard the ISS?

2. Lola (10): Did you always want to become an astronaut?

3. Lotte (13): Were you afraid during the Soyuz take-off?

4. Adele (13): Is it difficult to get used to zero-gravity?

5. Tiago (11): Do you sleep well in space?

6. Emma G (13): Is there any turbulence in the ISS as you would have with a plane?

7. Mayline (11): What was your first impression while performing a spacewalk?

8. Manon (11): Have you seen a lot of aurora borealis?

9. Antoine (11): Have you ever observed any bizarre or strange phenomenon aboard the ISS?

10. Kylian (14): Can you view the Thiviers quarries from space?

11. Nicolas (14): Is it possible to take a picture of Thiviers from space?

12. Emma D (13): What do you usually do during your spare time?

13. Emma N (11): What is the most complicated daily task you have ever done in space?

14. Yohann (11): What is the most fascinating task you have ever done in space?

15. Erwan (14): Is the physical training to become an astronaut hard?

16. Louis (11): Do astronauts loose or gain weight when in space and how much?

17. Eva (11): What is your best memory of space?

18. Baptiste (11): What is your worst memory of space?

19. Abe (14): Do you miss your friends and family?

20. Yoann (11): What makes you dream in your job?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

27 Novembre 2018

ARISS contact planned for students in Troyes, France

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Alexander Gerst KF5ONO with Ecole Primaire Jean Jaurès et Arnaud, Troyes, France. 

The event is scheduled Tuesday 27 November 2018 at approximately 16:28 UTC (17:28 CEWT). 

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD in Northern Italy.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Moreover, the event will be webcast from the telebridge ground station on
http://www.ariotti.com


School Information:

Troyes is pronounced -[trwa]-  but if it has been famous for centuries, it hasn’t got anything to do with the famous war in Greek mythology.
Original capital of the Champagne region, Troyes is a French city of artistic and historical importance located at one and a half hour from Paris.
At the heart of a French and European wide transport network, its strategic position made Troyes a centre of commercial influence during the Middle Ages 
and the birth place of the ‘Champagne Fairs’. Its 137 ha of protected land sits within the Seine diversion area which had been carried out in order to facilitate the textile industry. 

Today, Troyes is the European capital of the outlet centres (4M visitors/year), and it remains the city of knitting as it has been since the Middle Ages 
with brands such as Petit Bateau, DIM, Lacoste, Zadig et Voltaire, Absorba or Olympia having originated here. Its town centre, nicknamed ‘Champagne cork’ (because of its shape viewed from above), harbours a vast quantity of artistic and architectural treasures:

10 churches (listed status) , 5 museums , 10,000m2 of stained glass windows dating from the 13th to the 19th centuries ,

One of the most important libraries in France (more than 750000 books) including a unique set of documentary materials from the Middle Ages listed by UNESCO as a heritage site, The original editions of the Bible from Bernard de Clairvaux and the Diderot and d’Alembert Encyclopaedia. 

An awarded city: Child friendly city, City of heritage and art, European Heritage site, 4 blooms – ‘cities in bloom’, 2nd champagne producer worldwide, 
Active and sports friendly city, Troyes, 2015 disabled sports city, Cycling territory, Member of the OMS ‘Villes-Santé’ network. 

A genuine quality of life. Within its vibrant life basin,Troyes offers all the benefits of a 180000 inhabitants urban area in terms of health infrastructure, education, culture, 
services and shopping facilities. Troyes town centre is home to 140 national brands and a covered market opened 7 days a week. 

Troyes provides a prime and pleasant environment as well as a fully pledged quality service offering and reasonable living costs.
Boasting 150 ha of green spaces within the city boundaries, the inner city offers more than 25m2 of nature per inhabitant. 120 km of cycle lanes link (among other) the city to the Forêt d’Orient lakes and 31 additional kms are being planned in the suburbs. 

Our golden rule is proximity.With more than 10700 students – a number that has grown 5fold in the last 20 years – 30 higher education and research institutes and more than 170 training programmes, Troyes is the 2nd most attractive city in its category for students. 
Young city, Troyes boasts 35 state schools, 12 nurseries and 8 leisure centres.

School information:

Our school is divided into two: “Arnaud” Nursery and “Jean Jaures” primary schools.It hosts about 220 pupils from year 3 to year 11.
The school is built at the heart of the city centre nicknamed “Champagne cork” because of its shape viewed from above.

Arnaud Nursery is named after a painter, Marcel Arnaud. Jean Jaures Primary School is named after a famous French politician.

The pupils are delighted to work together and communicate on a common project. 
They can discover new things about Astronomy and the International Space Station and they can help each other.

Participating in the ARISS project offers them the opportunity to develop their scientific knowledge, their critical mind and their desire to learn. It gives meaning to what they learn, it combines their academic skills with the real world, and in the future, as citizens, they might be able to change the society in which they live. 

They are also excited and happy to be part of a project that develops their self-esteem and opens them up to the outside world.

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Anais (5): How are you doing?
2. Maya (10): What is your best feeling in space?
3. Martha (6): Can you see the colours of the stars?
4. Liham (5): Have you ever seen any aliens?
5. Alban (4): What’s your job on the ISS?
6. Juliette (10): Is it dangerous in space? If yes, what’s dangerous?
7. Saliha (5): Were you sad when the Soyuz rocket crashed last month?
8. Cali (10): Where and how can you find oxygen to breathe?
9. Faustyne (5): Is there a pipe that brings back your waste to Earth?
10. Ouma (10): What is a typical day like?
11. Rayane (5): Could you come and visit us in Troyes?
12. Jeanne (10): What do you do when you are outside the station?
13. Irina (6): What is beautiful in space?
14. Marius (10): Do you come across satellites in space?
15. Lily-Rose (10): Could you take a picture of Troyes, 48.176N and 4.046E?
16. Tessa (10): What personal things did you bring on board?
17. Horace (4): Do you feel sick in space?
18. Leon (9): How will you return to Earth?
19. Paul (4): Is there a phone in the ISS to call Michel Tognini?
20. Gael (4): Do you play games on board?
22. Lola (5): Do you sleep at night?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

24 Novembre 2018

 


ARISS contact planned for students in Canada

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Serena Aunon-Chancellor KG5TMT with IMP Aerospace & Defence, Goffs, NS, Canada. 

The event is scheduled Saturday 24 November 2018 at approximately 19:05 UTC (20:05 CEWT)

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD in Northern Italy.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Moreover, the event will be webcast from the telebridge ground station on
http://www.ariotti.com


School Information:

The IMP Company makes the Robotic Arms for the ISS and did for the Shuttles.
Despite the disappointment of having to cancel a previously planned ARISS in late September during our Family Day activities preparations for this next opportunity to speak with Serena are in full swing.  The original participants who were selected from a pool of applications received from our IMP Aerospace and Avionics facilities are prepared and looking forward to taking part in this very unique opportunity.  During the delay the youngsters were able to do additional research on station life and experiments which has resulted in some interesting questions that we hope Serena will enjoy.  As an ARISS Mentor it’s very encouraging to see the level of interest from the entire group including parents.

As a contractor IMP Aerospace has a long history in the manufacture of space rated avionics components.  This includes portions of STS Canadarm and the ISS Canadarm2 as well as numerous satellite and planetary rovers. The original contact was planned to take place in one of our maintenance hangars at Halifax Stanfield International Airport however with this new opportunity we have moved the venue to the Keshan Goodman Branch of the Halifax Public Library System.  This been the site of previous ARISS contacts and always draws a lot of attention.  This location allows us to invite media as well as the general public to observe and share in the inspiration this contact has to offer.  In addition to the usual pre-contact activities a presentation from the Halifax Center of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will focus on space based astronomy as well as specific instruction on how to identify visible ISS passes.  The contact will also have a potential for global viewing a!
s the contact will be simulcast from not only the library location but from the ground station located at IK1SLD in Northern Italy.


Students First Names & Questions:

1. Chloe (12):  What happens when you sneeze in space?

2. Xingyan (9):  What kind of physical training do you have to go through before going into space? 

3. Bria (12):  Do you believe signs of life, past or present, will be found in our Solar System?             

4. Ella (11):  What is the coolest thing you’ve seen from the Space Station?

5: Raelyn (8):  How do you handle medical issues in space especially if they are life-threatening? 

6: Callum (7):  What’s it like to be an astronaut?                         

7. Tyler (7):  What does it smell like inside the ISS? 

8. Trevor (7): Is any food grown on the Space Station?             

9. Milena (8): How do you do laundry on the ISS?                 

10. Alex (5):  How does your spacesuit stay warm?

11. Chloe (12): In order to maintain altitude or avoid orbital debris a reboost or avoidance maneuver is performed.  Can you feel that taking place inside the ISS?

12. Xingyan (9): How long did it take for you to adjust to the weightless environment on the ISS?

13. Bria (12): How does life spent on the underwater training laboratory “Aquarius” compare with life on the ISS?

14. Ella (14): Is it noisy or quiet inside the space station?

15. Raelyn (8): What has been the biggest health issue you’ve had to deal with?

16. Callum (7): What’s your favorite space meal?           

17. Tyler (7): How do Astronauts take a shower in space?

18. Trevor (7): Does the entire crew gather for meals?

19. Milena (8): What do you do in your spare time for entertainment?  

20. Alex (5): How do you know when to go to bed at night?

2ottobre 2018


ARISS contact planned for school in Newport, USA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Pell Elementary School, Newport, RI USA.

The event is scheduled Tuesday 02 October 2018 at approximately 17:45 UTC (19:45 CEST).

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by ON4ISS in Belgium.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

School Information:

Pell Elementary School is Newport, Rhode Island’s only grades K-4 school, with student population of 950.  The school’s namesake, Claiborne de Borda Pell served six terms as a U.S. senator from 1961 to 1997.  Senator Pell championed the “Basic Educational Opportunity Grant,” popularly   known as the “Pell Grant.”  Millions of low-income students have attained post-secondary education through the benefit of this federal grant program.  Pell believed education should be the right of every citizen, to better their own life, and to strengthen our nation.

Pell Elementary has a diverse, multicultural population due in part to the nearby U.S. Naval War College which attracts many foreign naval officers and their families.  Our English language learner population is 12%, while 57% of our students are children of color, and 65% qualify for free (or reduced price) lunch.

Teachers at Pell School regularly incorporate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) exploration into their classroom. Students attend weekly STEM classes during which they tackle real-world challenges. They are introduced to the “Engineering Design Process,” coding, and careers in STEM fields.  Kindergarten and first grade students explore computational thinking using a variety of on and off-line algorithmic tools.  Older students are introduced to coding using MIT Media Lab’s Scratch and Code.org.

Our faculty encourages students to take risks, solve problems, engage in experiential learning, and collaborate.  Pell students have engaged in space-related and radio activities ahead of this event which also coincides with “World Space Week, ” a United Nations-sponsored annual initiative geared to strengthen the link between space and society.

The space chat will be the highlight of the week, with activities planned, in the following week, to celebrate this year’s theme, “Space Unites the World.”  With help from the Amateur Radio aboard the ISS (ARISS) volunteers around the world and our community partners, Pell students will witness “Rhode Island Space Chat #3.”  Four hundred students and guests are expected inside the school gymnasium with many others watching via livestream.

We are excited and honored to participate in this unique, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Sean (grade 2): What time do you wake up and what is the first thing you do?

2. Adam (grade 4): My dad likes to drink coffee; do you have good tasting coffee on the ISS?

3. Jordan (grade 2): Does someone make you shower every day?

4. Gilber (grade 4): How do you celebrate your birthdays?

5. Khalil (grade 4): Do you ever get presents delivered to you from Earth?

6. Jacobee (grade 1): What kinds of games do you play with your crew?

7. Ariyah (grade 1): Why aren’t there more girl astronauts?

8. Alan (grade 2):  What timezone do you follow?

9. Jaiya (grade 2): Do you wash your clothes in space?

10. Sadie (grade 2): Where does the ISS trash go?

11. Yamille (grade 3): How do you keep the ISS clean and healthy?

12. Logan (grade 1):  Do you have to wash down the outside of the ISS and its solar panels, like a car gets washed?

13. Lacey (grade 3): Do you have a secret room that gives you privacy?

14. Sidonie (grade 1): Why are spacesuits always white?

15. Kevoy (grade 2): How many astronauts can go on a spacewalk at once?

16. Vale (grade 3): How do you prepare for a spacewalk?

17. Giovanna (grade 2): We grow tomatoes at school. Do you grow plants using hydroponics?

18. Kelly (grade 3): I’m Russian; do you think there are other life forms in the cosmos?

19. Ethan (grade 4): How do you eat without choking when there’s no gravity to hold down the food?

20. Wilson (grade 4): How would you feel if you didn’t exercise and then returned to Earth?

21. Aaleigh (grade 5): Who inspired you to be an astronaut?

22. Kayai (grade 5): What did you study in college?

23. Mr Sherman (teacher grade 1): Do space plants grow much faster when using plant food?

24. Mrs. Grimes (nurse):  How do you handle a serious medical emergency?

25. Ms Westman (principal):  As principal, I am the director of learning at school.  Who is the leader on the ISS?

26. Mr. McEneaney (music teacher): Are there any musical instruments on the ISS?

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.


27 agosto 2018

ARISS contact planned for school in Devikhet, India 

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Shri Timli Vidyapeet, Devikhet, India

The event is scheduled Monday 27 August 2018 at approximately 08:06 UTC (10:06 CEST). 

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by ON4ISS in Belgium.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

School Information:

Established in 1882, Shri Timli Vidyapeeth is a gateway to Vedic and global education and empowers an individual with the Vedic and Scientific Knowledge, Skills & Attitude enabling them to be a true Future Global Leader. Our campus is in Pauri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand, a Himalayan state.
Shri Timli Vidyapeeth Students learn Vedic & 21st Century Life-Skills such as:
Vedic education in Sanskrit Language
Knowledge and Awareness of local Culture and Art
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence
Agility and Adaptability
Initiative and Entrepreneurship
Accessing and Analyzing Information

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Pragya Dabral (12): Does space junk cause a potential problem for the Space Station?

2. Sangeeta Rawat (14): Why don’t you run out of oxygen on the International Space Station?

3. Vasu Negi (14): What is it like being in zero gravity?

4. Deepak Jugran (15): Have you ever seen an alien or a UFO?

5. Akhilesh Negi (11): Have you ever seen a black hole?

6. Sristhi Naithani (11): Do we use our all five senses in space?

7. Prearna (10): Being an astronaut, do you believe in God?

8. Alok Jakhmola (9): How can a spacecraft fly in the absence of air?

9. Vipin Negi (9): Do you get time to speak with your family and friends

10. Vipin Soni (10): What is the speed of life in space?

11. Rashmi (7): How will the Russian cargo ship change life in ISS?

12. Soham Dabral (10): Tell us how the A.I. robot (CIMON) is helping you there?

13. Aditya (8): Which part of the world looks more beautiful from space?

14. Vitishta (7): Would you be a mentor for our school’s technology club?

15. Priyanshu (8): Can you see fireworks on earth from the ISS?

16. Priyanshu Tomar (13): Is your perspective for life changed after living in ISS?

17. Amit Singh (13): How do you measure time in space?

18. Ankush Singh (14): Will we be able to travel in space as a visitor in future?

19. Suraj Singh (15): Your one message for all of us living in Himalayas?

20. Km Pinki (15): What inspired you to become an astronaut?

21. Km Amrita (14): Will there be smell in food if we keep it open for several days in space?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto in tedesco 27 giugno 2018

ARISS contact planned for two schools in Germany

As announced earlier, an International Space Station school contact has been planned for Alexander Gerst KF5ONO with two schools in Germany:
–    Werner Heisenberg Gymnasium, Leverkusen
–    Schickhardt Gymnasium, Herrenberg.

The event is scheduled Wednesday 27 June 2018 at approximately 10:32 UTC (12:32 CEST).

The conversation will be conducted in German.

The contact will be a direct operated by DL0IL and DL0SGH.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM. 
Moreover, the event will be web streamed:

Leverkusen: 
https://youtu.be/Z-ZaCAnfLpQ 
Herrenberg:
https://live.ariss.org/ 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Yasna (11): How does the human body change in outer space? 
2. Victor (11): Does your biorhythm change in space and can you sleep well? 
3. Eva (17): Is it true that people cannot belch in space? 
4. Tessa (11): Which everyday commodities and habits do you miss most? 
5. Max (14): Is it possible to light a candle in the space station, and if so, what does it look like? 
6. Roman (16): Do you see the fireworks on New Year’s Eve on the ISS? 
7. Lena (16): Do you think that the idea of populating the Moon and Mars in near future is realistic? 
8. Lorenz (16): Have you ever lost anything outside the ISS? 
9. Max (17): What do you think about the disposal of waste, e. g. electronic scrap, in outer space? 
10. Sven (17): What would you ask an astronaut if you were not an astronaut yourself? 
11. Charlotte (13): How clean is the air inside the ISS? Do you need to do dusting? 
12. David (13): What did your assistant CIMON surprise you the most with? 
13. Linda (11): What does it feel like to go on a spacewalk? 
14. Lorent (11): What was your most exceptional experience in outer space? 
15. Anna (18): How difficult is it to readjust to life on earth after a long stay in space? 
16. Maurice (15): Which spaceship would you take to fly to the ISS if you had the choice between the time-tested Soyuz capsule or the new Dragon V2? 
17. Max (14): How fast is your internet connection on the ISS? 
18. Lukas (15): What would happen in case of an acute medical emergency, e. g. appendicitis? 
19. Anne (17): Is it possible to fly directly to the moon from the ISS? 
20. Benjamin (9): What is your favorite food on the space station?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 27 giugno

ARISS contact planned for two schools in Germany

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Alexander Gerst KF5ONO with two schools in Germany:
–    Werner Heisenberg Gymnasium, Leverkusen
–    Schickhardt Gymnasium, Herrenberg.

The event is scheduled Wednesday 27 June 2018 at approximately 10:32 UTC.  

The conversation will be conducted in German.

The contact will be a direct operated by DL0IL and DL0GH.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe.

School Information:

Werner-Heisenberg-Gymnasium

The Werner Heisenberg Gymnasium in Leverkusen was among the first schools that joined the national MINT EC network of excellence schools in science and is an IB world school offering its students the International Baccalaureate (IB).

Another focus is set on language in our French German bilingual program. Care has been taken that both degrees may be pursued simultaneously as we have found that one talent is often connected to the other.

The WHG mission is:  To build and develop a social community, to strengthen personality and character, and to enjoy and succeed in learning.

In STEM classes, students focus on core subjects like mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology with additional optional courses in astronomy and computer science. In 8th and 9th grade, students take science classes covering interdisciplinary subjects with a special application focus. In small groups, students define and research their own projects, which they present to a jury from local industry during a science fair at the end of 9th grade. 

In addition, there is a diverse choice of project courses (AGs): Our students may join the Jazz band or the Theater AG, which are well-known for their performances. The Astronomy AG has constructed a large, scaled version of the solar system in the schoolyard and has specialized in moon and planet photography.

In the French bilingual class, more lessons are allocated to French, and history, geography and politics are taught in French. With their high school diplomas, students in this branch are granted access to French universities.

Complementary to science and language education, WHG also focuses on social education: In 9th grade, students participate in a mandatory practical training at a social organization (kindergarten, hospital, retirement or nursing home, work with handicapped or homeless people) to help develop social responsibility.

Schickhardt Gymnasium

Our school, the Schickhardt Gymnasium, is located in Herrenberg which is a small city south of Stuttgart. 
This is in the heart of a region known nationally and internationally for technology (i. e. automobiles) and 
IT advancement but also for its old universities and its history.
Beyond the regular subjects like Maths, German, 
English, P.E., Arts, and social sciences, this is reflected in the profiles our school offers from which the students can choose their focus. On one hand, the language profile with French, Spanish and Latin as options. On the other hand, we have the profile of natural sciences and technology, i.e. NwT (science and technology), Biology, Physics, IT and Chemistry. Both profiles are also visible in the clubs and exchanges which are offered: Aerospace Lab, Robotics, ISS, Theatre, Musical, Print and the KuCa (which organizes cultural events – among others a presentation by Professor Dr. Heinz Voggenreiter), among others. Students are also dedicated to social projects, e.g. Fairtrade, Model United Nations, schools against racism and the aid-organization Casa Alianza. Exchanges go to Sweden, France, the USA, Botswana, and Hungary.

This secondary school with about 750 students and 70 teachers is excited to be taking part in the ARISS program. 
The project team consists of members of different age levels motivated by their interests in outer space, technology, space travel, journalism, and many other talents which are contributing to making this project a reality.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Yasna (11): How does the human body change in outer space? 
2. Victor (11): Does your biorhythm change in space and can you sleep well? 
3. Eva (17): Is it true that people cannot belch in space? 
4. Tessa (11): Which everyday commodities and habits do you miss most? 
5. Max (14): Is it possible to light a candle in the space station, and if so, what does it look like? 
6. Roman (16): Do you see the fireworks on New Year’s Eve on the ISS? 
7. Lena (16): Do you think that the idea of populating the Moon and Mars in near future is realistic? 
8. Lorenz (16): Have you ever lost anything outside the ISS? 
9. Max (17): What do you think about the disposal of waste, e. g. electronic scrap, in outer space? 
10. Sven (17): What would you ask an astronaut if you were not an astronaut yourself? 
11. Charlotte (13): How clean is the air inside the ISS? Do you need to do dusting? 
12. David (13): What did your assistant CIMON surprise you the most with? 
13. Linda (11): What does it feel like to go on a spacewalk? 
14. Lorent (11): What was your most exceptional experience in outer space? 
15. Anna (18): How difficult is it to readjust to life on earth after a long stay in space? 
16. Maurice (15): Which spaceship would you take to fly to the ISS if you had the choice between the time-tested Soyuz capsule or the new Dragon V2? 
17. Max (14): How fast is your internet connection on the ISS? 
18. Lukas (15): What would happen in case of an acute medical emergency, e. g. appendicitis? 
19. Anne (17): Is it possible to fly directly to the moon from the ISS? 
20. Benjamin (9): What is your favorite food on the space station?

1. Yasna (11): Wie veraendert sich der menschliche Koerper im Weltall? 
2. Victor (11): Veraendert sich auch Ihr Biorhythmus im All und koennen Sie gut schlafen? 
3. Eva (17): Stimmt es, dass man im Weltraum nicht ruelpsen kann? 
4. Tessa (11): Welche alltaeglichen Dinge und Gewohnheiten vermissen Sie am meisten? 
5. Max (14): Kann man eine Kerze in der Raumstation anzünden, wenn ja wie sieht sie dann aus? 
6. Roman (16): Sieht man an Silvester das Feuerwerk von der ISS aus? 
7. Lena (16): Finden Sie die Idee Mond und Mars in naher Zukunft zu besiedeln realistisch? 
8. Lorenz (16): Haben Sie schon einmal etwas ausserhalb der ISS verloren? 
9. Max (17): Was halten Sie von der Entsorgung von Muell, z. B. von Elektroschrott, im Weltraum? 
10. Sven (17): Was wuerden Sie einen Astronauten fragen, wenn Sie selber nicht Astronaut waeren? 
11. Charlotte (13): Wie sauber ist die Luft auf der ISS, muss man Staubwischen? 
12. David (13): Womit hat Ihr Assistent CIMON Sie am meisten ueberrascht? 
13. Linda (11): Wie fuehlt es sich an, einen Raumspaziergang zu machen?
14. Lorent (11): Was war das Außergewoehnlichste, was sie im All erlebt haben? 
15. Anna (18): Wie schwer ist es, sich nach einem laengeren Aufenthalt im All wieder an das Leben auf der Erde zu gewoehnen? 
16. Maurice (15): Wenn Sie die Wahl haetten zwischen der bewaehrten Sojus-Kapsel oder der neuen Dragon-V2, welche wuerden Sie fuer einen Flug zur ISS bevorzugen? 
17. Max (14): Wie schnell ist Ihr Internetanschluss auf der ISS?
18. Lukas (15): Was wuerde bei einem akuten medizinischen Notfall, z. B. einer Blinddarmentzuendung, passieren? 
19. Anne (17): Kann man direkt von der ISS aus zum Mond fliegen? 
20. Benjamin (9): Was ist Ihr Lieblingsessen auf der Raumstation?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

aggiornamenti

Several upcoming ARISS events:
ARISS-Russia, in collaboration with the Southwest State University in Kursk, Russia, are developing a series of educational CubeSat satellites called Tanusha. Two Tanusha CubeSats were developed by students at Southwest State University and were hand-deployed by cosmonauts during an August 2017 extravehicular activity. These two CubeSats are performing cluster flight experiments through communications links. A second set of CubeSats, Tanusha 3 & 4 were launched earlier this year and are currently on-board ISS. Tanusha 3 & 4 are planned to be hand deployed by Cosmonauts in August. They will perform even more comprehensive cluster flight objectives than Tanusha 1 & 2.
On June 20, Tanusha 3 will be connected to one of the ARISS Service Module antennas and will transmit from 0730-1200 UTC on 437.05 MHz. These FM transmissions will include greetings from students in several languages, including Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese. On June 21, Tanusha 4 will be connected to one of the ARISS Service Module antennas and will transmit from 0730-1200 UTC on the same frequency: 437.05 MHz. The ARISS-Russia team plan to also retransmit these signals on the standard ARISS 2-meter downlink, 145.80 MHz using the JVC Kenwood D700 radio that is still on-board ISS. All are invited to listen to the CubeSats from ISS on 437.05 and/or 145.80 MHz.
The next SSTV image downlinks are planned for June 29-July 1. These images will commemorate the various satellites that the ARISS team has developed and hand-deployed from the ISS. These will include the first satellite deployment from ISS: SuitSat-1/Radioskaf-1 which was deployed in February 2006. More details on this will be forthcoming as the date draws near.
We thank ARISS-Russia delegate Sergey Samburov, RV3DR for this latest information.