Archivi categoria: ARISS

Categoria utilizzata per l’invio tramite email degli annunci di contatto della ISS

contatto 19 aprile 2018

start: ARISS contact planned for school in Warwick, UK

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Ricky Arnold KE5DAU with Kings High School, Warwick, UK.

The event is scheduled on Thursday 19 April 2018 at approximately 12.05 UTC.  

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KHS.

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

Moreover, the event will be webcast real time:

1100 UTC : Web stream to start.  The school will welcome everyone, including those on the stream and will proceed into the presentations from the students on their activities that have led up to the contact itself.

1145 UTC : ARISS Operations UK will take over and provide the context for the contact itself.

1205 UTC : ARISS Contact with Ricky Arnold.

1215 UTC : ARISS contact concludes and final address from the school.
The web stream will be available on https://live.ariss.org

School Information:

The Mars story of the school

The Mars project, envisioned by a student after watching Tim Peake’s 2016 mission, is our chance to inspire more girls while in their formative years, to consider studying science at A level and beyond.

Since 1879 King’s High Warwick has been championing girls in science and STEM subjects as one of the leading all-girls schools in the Midlands. The importance of girls’ education back then was viewed as inferior to that of boys and the early headmistresses of King’s set about trying to change that. Over a hundred years on girls and boy’s education is viewed as equal, however the number of girls in science and STEM subjects is still not equal to our male counterparts; through school and into the workplace. Just 35% of girls choose maths, physics and computing compared to 94% of boys

The Project One campus is the latest opportunity for King’s girls, consisting of brand new school buildings on the Warwick School site. It will feature state of the art science labs, enabling future generations of girls to study with the best facilities possible. The future King’s girls at the Prep and local schools will use these labs for their time at King’s and we believe the Mars Project will inspire them to see what studying STEM can lead to, helped by access to high quality equipment. The project will assist in creating a collaborative relationship between the wide variety of subjects that have previously had minimal cross over in their syllabuses. The focus on Mars and astronomy links directly to the A Level Physics syllabus, inspiring more girls to study physics beyond GCSE. The supra-curricula activities conducted as a part of the project, such as building rovers in DT widen the educational experience of girls and enable them to see the real-life applications !
of their learning.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. (Eleanor G, Yr12): When we colonize Mars, what is the most important thing we need to learn from our ancestors’ mistakes on Earth?

2. (Florence J, Yr 4): What types of weather can you get on Mars that we would have to tackle if humans were going to live there?

3. (Shubhangi B, Yr12): Considering the research into life support systems on the ISS and research into in-situ resource utilization, how long after the first manned mission to Mars do you think that a Mars colony can be self-sufficient?

4. (Gigi T, Yr9): Now that you are on the ISS would you have done anything differently during training, physically or mentally?

5. (Emma W, Yr12): Having experienced the vastness of space, do you believe there are other forms of life in the universe?

6. (Maddy S-L, Yr11): How has your journey to space changed your perspective on human life?

7. (Imogen M, Yr11): What aspect of space travel do you think needs to be improved in the next 10 years to get us further into space?

8. (Evey H, Yr12): What is the most magnificent place on Earth from space?

9. (Rosie S, Yr7): How does not having daylight or seasons in space affect you compared to being on Earth?

10. (Olivia L, Yr6): Is it true that the atmosphere changes your sense of taste up in space?

11. (Shivanshi B, Yr9): How does the feeling of weightlessness compare to the training underwater on Earth?

12. (Martha F, Yr10): How far into the future is the technology needed to make travelling between solar systems the norm?

13. (Olivia B, Yr11): We all know space can be a dangerous environment. How do you and your fellow astronauts protect yourselves whilst on the ISS?

14. (Emma C, Yr11): What does your training on Earth entail to help you cope with the effects of the lack of gravity on your sleep?

15. (Emma R, Yr9): What part of nature do you miss most from Earth when you are in space?

16. (Holly S, Yr10): How difficult is it for your body to adjust to life in space?

17. (Amy P, Yr9): What’s the one thing that surprised you most when you first saw Earth from space?

18. (Jade B, Yr11): What’s your advice to young people dreaming of becoming involved in space programs?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

Contatto: 27 Marzo 2018

start: ARISS contact planned for schools in Freeport, NY, USA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with  Freeport Public Schools, Freeport, NY, USA.

The event is scheduled on Tuesday 27 March 2018 at approximately 17.41 UTC.

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD in Northern Italy.
The downlink should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink.

School Information:
Freeport Public Schools is located in the city of Freeport, about 25 miles east of New York City. The district is composed of 8 schools—one pre-K school, four elementary schools, one intermediate middle school, one middle school, and one high school. The total student enrollment is 7,400 and 90% of the students are Hispanic or African-American. Science is taught in all grades, and at the high school students enroll in Advanced Placement classes in physics (calculus and non-calculus based), chemistry, biology, and environmental science. We also have a research class in each of the grades 7-12 that is open to all students.

Our students have participated in the International Astronomical Search Campaign to confirm or discover asteroids that exist in the asteroid belt. We confirmed the discovery of two asteroids, received two plaques from NASA and then published a paper on our work in a leading physics educational journal. One of our teachers and his students travelled to California Institute of Technology to take part in NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. One of the students who participated in this research program is now majoring in astrophysics.

Our students have been preparing for our conversation with Scott Tingle from early last summer. This unique opportunity to speak and observe Scott in the International Space Station has generated tremendous enthusiasm for science among our students. Going forward, we plan to design an experiment that can be conducted in the Space Station. At some point in the future we would also like to invite Mr. Tingle to come to our school and give a science seminar.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Lesley (15): If an astronaut gets a bacterial infection, do antibiotics work in space as they do on Earth?

2. Jayden (13): Could you describe the ‘SUPVIS Justin’ experiment you conducted on March 2 and the next steps in this work

3. Sarah (12): How has your perspective about the Earth changed as a result of your trip to the Space Station?

4. Jonavan (10): What are the duties of a typical astronaut on his/her first day in space?

5. Johan (10): Does the immune system become impaired after a prolonged stay in space?

6. Gabriela (10): What does it look like from space when seasons are changing?

7. Ava (10): How does age effect how the body reacts in space?

8. Giovanni (12): What are the uses of the robotic arm?

9. Brenna (14): You plan to do one or more spacewalks in your trip aboard the ISS. Could you describe the biggest challenge you face in such missions?

10. Adisa (16): How often and how does ISS adjust its trajectory to maintain a constant orbit?

11. Lesley (15): If astronauts leave the Earth at around 17,000 mph why does it take so long to reach the ISS located approximately 250 miles above the Earth?

12. Jayden (13): I know you like fluid mechanics. Could you describe the fluid mechanics experiments you are involved in?

13. Sarah (12): Has the ISS National Laboratory found any possible organisms that can survive the harsh conditions of space for a prolonged period of time?

14. Jonavan (10): What would happen if you got sick in space?

15. Johan (10): You will be doing a number of experiments aboard the ISS. Could you describe one that interests you the most?

16. Gabriela (10): How can we help pets to survive in outer space for longer periods of time?

17. Ava (10): What are the effects of blood rushing to astronauts’ heads in a microgravity environment?

18. Giovanni (12): You were one of the first responders in the September 2001 terrorist attacks. Could you describe your role?

19. Brenna (14): Knowing there is debris in space can you describe briefly how ISS detects objects moving toward the station?

20. Adisa (16): Due to varying laws governing research in various countries, does each country work solely on their own project or are projects codependent?

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

 

contatto 21 febbraio

ARISS contact planned for school in Portugal

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Agrupamento de Escolas do Fundao, Fundao, Portugal

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 21 February 2018 at approximately 9.38 UTC.   

The contact will be a direct operated by CS5DBB

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:

The school is located in Fundao, in the mainland Portugal Centre Region.  This town, of approx. 9000 inhabitants, has grown in a fertile valley between the Gardunha and Estrela mountains and is located about 252 km from Lisbon and Oporto, 200 km from Coimbra and a few kilometers from the Spanish border. This is a region especially devoted to agriculture.  There are also a few industries and services and an important university nearby. Olive oil, wine, and cheese are well-known products of this region, together with an increasing and important cherry production that puts Portugal in a pleasant place in the exportation rankings. The highest place in mainland Portugal is located in the neighborhood the Estrela mountain (1997 mts.) which brings an important number of visitors especially during the snow season.

In June 2012, the school has become an aggregation of several schools for students aged 3-18 which has enlarged the institution. There are 1573 students and 176 teachers. The school has a large variety of student profiles as well as families. Pupils start here the kindergarten until they complete the secondary education, which means it offers an educational project during 12 years. Besides the basic 3 cycles of studies, a wide amount of courses in the secondary education are offered. The secondary regular courses vary from Sciences and Technologies, Economics to Visual Arts and Humanities. There is also an offer of vocational courses.

Some students are taking part in the 2018 European CanSat Competition of the European Space Agency (ESA). A CanSat is a simulation of a real satellite, integrated within the volume and shape of a soft drink can.  Last year, they also participated in the European Astro Pi Challenge which is a project by the ESA Education Office, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, offering primary and secondary school students the amazing opportunity to run scientific investigations on the International Space Station (ISS) by means of computer coding.

The Rede dos Emissores Portugueses (REP) was founded in 1926. The REP, as national member society, represents Portugal in the IARU since 1931.  The REP headquarters is located in Lisbon, however, there are numbers of HAM radio clubs in different regions of Portugal. The REP Delegacao da Beira Baixa CS5DBB is a delegation of the National Club REP and collaborates with the school in educational and technical preparations for the direct ARISS school contact and other projects.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Beatriz (16): What kind of food do you eat on the ISS?

2. Marco (16): What was the daily routine that took you the longest to get used to on the ISS?

3. Joao (16): What do you do in case of a fire on the station?

4. Pedro P. (16): How long did you take to get used to living in low gravity conditions?

5. Pedro B. (16): What kind of scientific experiments can you do in space and not on Earth?

6. Rodrigo (16): What is the most lifelike science fiction movie that you have ever seen?

7. Mariana (16): In which direction do plants grow aboard the International Space Station?

8. Joana (16): What did you feel during the launch?

9. Catarina (16): Do you have to wear any special type of clothes on the ISS?

10. Afonso (16): What do you have to do if someone gets the ISS dirty by, for example, puking on it?

11. Andre (15): What are you doing in your free time to have fun?

12. Diogo (15): What was the hardest experience you ever had on the ISS?

13. Alexandra (16): What kind of physical and psychological preparations did you need to be an astronaut?

14. Rute (15): What did you feel when you saw the Earth from the ISS for the first time?

15. Carmo (16): What do you miss the most when you are staying in the ISS?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.orgwww.ariss-eu.organd https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

contatto 21 febbraio 2018

ARISS contact planned for school in Portugal

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Agrupamento de Escolas do Fundao, Fundao, Portugal

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 21 February 2018 at approximately 9.38 UTC.   

The contact will be a direct operated by CS5DBB

The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:

The school is located in Fundao, in the mainland Portugal Centre Region.  This town, of approx. 9000 inhabitants, has grown in a fertile valley between the Gardunha and Estrela mountains and is located about 252 km from Lisbon and Oporto, 200 km from Coimbra and a few kilometers from the Spanish border. This is a region especially devoted to agriculture.  There are also a few industries and services and an important university nearby. Olive oil, wine, and cheese are well-known products of this region, together with an increasing and important cherry production that puts Portugal in a pleasant place in the exportation rankings. The highest place in mainland Portugal is located in the neighborhood the Estrela mountain (1997 mts.) which brings an important number of visitors especially during the snow season.

In June 2012, the school has become an aggregation of several schools for students aged 3-18 which has enlarged the institution. There are 1573 students and 176 teachers. The school has a large variety of student profiles as well as families. Pupils start here the kindergarten until they complete the secondary education, which means it offers an educational project during 12 years. Besides the basic 3 cycles of studies, a wide amount of courses in the secondary education are offered. The secondary regular courses vary from Sciences and Technologies, Economics to Visual Arts and Humanities. There is also an offer of vocational courses.

Some students are taking part in the 2018 European CanSat Competition of the European Space Agency (ESA). A CanSat is a simulation of a real satellite, integrated within the volume and shape of a soft drink can.  Last year, they also participated in the European Astro Pi Challenge which is a project by the ESA Education Office, in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, offering primary and secondary school students the amazing opportunity to run scientific investigations on the International Space Station (ISS) by means of computer coding.

The Rede dos Emissores Portugueses (REP) was founded in 1926. The REP, as national member society, represents Portugal in the IARU since 1931.  The REP headquarters is located in Lisbon, however, there are numbers of HAM radio clubs in different regions of Portugal. The REP Delegacao da Beira Baixa CS5DBB is a delegation of the National Club REP and collaborates with the school in educational and technical preparations for the direct ARISS school contact and other projects.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Beatriz (16): What kind of food do you eat on the ISS?

2. Marco (16): What was the daily routine that took you the longest to get used to on the ISS?

3. Joao (16): What do you do in case of a fire on the station?

4. Pedro P. (16): How long did you take to get used to living in low gravity conditions?

5. Pedro B. (16): What kind of scientific experiments can you do in space and not on Earth?

6. Rodrigo (16): What is the most lifelike science fiction movie that you have ever seen?

7. Mariana (16): In which direction do plants grow aboard the International Space Station?

8. Joana (16): What did you feel during the launch?

9. Catarina (16): Do you have to wear any special type of clothes on the ISS?

10. Afonso (16): What do you have to do if someone gets the ISS dirty by, for example, puking on it?

11. Andre (15): What are you doing in your free time to have fun?

12. Diogo (15): What was the hardest experience you ever had on the ISS?

13. Alexandra (16): What kind of physical and psychological preparations did you need to be an astronaut?

14. Rute (15): What did you feel when you saw the Earth from the ISS for the first time?

15. Carmo (16): What do you miss the most when you are staying in the ISS?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters interest in science, technology, and learning.

Contatto del 12/2 spostato al 14/2

ARISS contact for schools in Vilnius, Lithuania postponed

The International Space Station school contact for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Vilniaus Jono Basanaviciaus Gymnasium together with Vilniaus Jono Basanaviciaus Progymnasium, Vilnius, Lithuania, which was scheduled for Monday 12 February as announced by the previous News Bulletin, has been postponed. 

The event is now scheduled on Wednesday 14 February 2018 at approximately 12.37 UTC with Joe Acaba KE5DAR.   


14 Febbraio 2018 spazio allo spazio propone “alla scoperta delle regioni polari”

I nostri amici di “Spazio allo Spazio” propongono un’evento a tema esplorazione, qui di seguito i link al loro blog e allo streaming
Mercoledì 14 febbraio 2018

Progetto AUSDA “Alla scoperta delle regioni polari” –  Federico Giglio CNR ISMAR Bologna

diretta streaming ore 9:45 all’indirizzo http://spazioallospazio.blogspot.it

A seguire proiezione del film documentario “RESEt, una classe alle Svalbard” – Promosso da Fondazione OMD Milano. Saranno presenti in sala alcuni protagonisti del film.

http://www.youtube.com/spazioallospazio

http://spazioallospazio.blogspot.it

Gruppo di lavoro “Spazio allo Spazio
in collaborazione con Ufficio Scolastico Territoriale Monza Brianza

 
Immagine in linea 1

contatto 12 Febbraio

 

ARISS contact planned for schools in Vilnius, Lithuania    An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Scott Tingle KG5NZA with Vilniaus Jono Basanaviciaus Gymnasium together with Vilniaus Jono Basanaviciaus Progymnasium, Vilnius, Lithuania    The event is scheduled on Monday 12 February 2018 at approximately 12:45 UTC.       The contact will be a direct operated by LY1BWB.   The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink.     School Information:  We are students of the Vilnius Jonas Basanaviciaus Gymnasium and Progymnasium.  Both of the schools are located in Vilnius, in the capital of Lithuania.  Here we are taught of all basic subjects such as physics, chemistry, biology, math, etc.  Our project team was assembled from both schools and each member has their own motivation to join, some of us are here to see what it's like to make an amateur radio contact and talk to a person in space, some are here for the generic experience, while others try to figure out if space science would be what they want to do in their future lives.    Our team extends from writers, filmmakers to technical people, so everyone can try out everything and do what they like most.  Best thing about this project is that it is a very unique way to celebrate the 100 years of Lithuania??s independence.  All involved students will be able to mark this historical moment with such a powerful milestone and inspire future generations so that they never stop learning new things and never give up reaching new horizons.    


Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:    
1. Haroldas 18: Jonas Basanavicius was named person of the century in Lithuania. What kind of person would you choose to be your country's person of the century?   
2. Radvilas 14: Can you see Lithuania from your current position?   
3. Dominykas 18: What is your opinion about inflatable habitats that were tested in the ISS?   
4. Karolis 18: If you could ever travel to one of the planets, which would you choose?   
5. Kasparas 18: How your stay in space differs from what you had expected?   
6. Lukas 16: Are there any disagreements between crewmembers?   7. Ignas 15: What extreme situations might be faced in the ISS?   8. Mante 16: What was the first thing you saw through the window of the ISS?   
9. Gleb 18: Who would you be if you were not an Astronaut?   10. Povilas 13: If you had an opportunity to talk to someone from the past, who would it be?   
11. Saule 18: What annoys you the most in ISS?   
12. Jurga 18: Is the silence in space deeper than on Earth?   13. Modestas 16: How do you relax in space?   
14. Akvile 13: Have you ever seen space junk colliding?   
15. Rimgaudas 14: Which do you think is scarier; ascending or landing?   
16. Justina 18: According to which time zone do you celebrate New Year?
17. Antanas 16: How do paper planes fly in the space station?
18. Lukas 18: What is going to be your first meal when you come back?
19. Erika 14: Do you use lasers made in Lithuania in your work?
20: Povilas 16: How long does it take you to catch up with fashion?

contatto 31 gennaio 2018

ARISS contact planned for school in Batesville, Arizona, USA
An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Joe Acaba KE5DAR with Central Magnet Math & Science ES/Batesville School District, Batesville, Arizona.

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 31 January 2018 at approximately 16.42 UTC.  

The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD in Northern Italy.
The contact should be audible in parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz FM downlink. 

School Information:
Central Magnet Elementary is located in Batesville, Ark. The school?s magnet theme is math and science. We are a grade K through 6 school with about 359 students.  In addition to classroom learning, students explore math and science in the school’s computer lab and STEM lab. Students in our school have recently won competitions in robotics. We also host a science fair. Every fall, our 5th grade class attends a field trip to Space Camp at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This field trip is very inspiring to our students. In leading up to the school’s ISS contact, classroom lesson plans are including topics about the ISS and space. The students have also been given assignments to watch for the ISS when it passes overhead in the evening. All local TV, radio, and print media will be invited to the ARISS event. Central Magnet is looking forward to speaking to an astronaut aboard the ISS.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1. Walker (4th): How do astronauts travel to and from the space station?
2. Gareth (4th): Is your sense of time distorted because you are orbiting the earth every 90 minutes?
3. Yuridia (4th): What is it like to perform an EVA?
4. AshLee (5th): How do you keep in contact with your family?
5. Leslie (5th): How do the stars look from the space station?
6. Elizabeth (5th): What is it like to transition to micro gravity when you arrive at the space station?
8. Alexander (6th): What inspired you to become an astronaut?
9. Aya (6th): What are the experiments you work on aboard the space station? 
10. Ty (6th): How does the space station get oxygen?
11. Walker (6th): Do you crave certain foods while you are in space?
12. Gareth (6th): How do you spend your free time on the space station?
13. Yuridia (6th): Do you play any games, sports or exercise while in space?
14. AshLee (5th): What is your perspective of seeing the Earth?s weather from space?
15. Leslie (5th): Are you hopeful astronauts will return to the moon?
16. Elizabeth (5th): How long will you be staying on the ISS?
17. Melody (4th): What happens to the trash you produce on the ISS?
18. Alexander (4th): Is it comfortable sleeping in a weightless environment?
19. Aya (4th): How do astronauts take care of medical problems while in space?
20. Ty (4th): What advice can you give for students wishing to become an astronaut?

About ARISS: 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide special support.  

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see: http://www.ariss.org/ , http://www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/ .

73,

Gaston Bertels – ON4WF
ARISS Europe

bentornato Paolo Nespoli

PAOLO NESPOLI È RIENTRATO A TERRA

14 Dicembre 2017

L’astronauta dell’ESA Paolo Nespoli è rientrato a Terra questa mattina dopo 139 giorni nello spazio. Il viaggio verso casa dalla Stazione Spaziale Internazionale ha richiesto di passare dai 28.800 km/h di crociera all’arresto finale in appena tre ore.

Paolo ed i membri dell’equipaggio Randy Bresnik, della NASA, e Sergei Ryazansky, di Roscosmos, hanno toccato terra, nella steppa kazaka, alle 09:37 ora italiana (08:37 GMT).

La navetta Soyuz MS-05 ha sopportato le sollecitazioni della discesa e dell’atterraggio come previsto: il suo scudo termico ha raggiunto i 1.600 gradi durante il rientro in atmosfera, mentre all’interno della navicella gli astronauti hanno sperimentato fino quattro volte il proprio peso corporeo.

A 10 km di altitudine i paracadute si sono aperti, prima che i retrorazzi fornissero la frenata finale prima di toccare terra.

“Il cosiddetto atterraggio morbido è come un frontale tra un camion ed una utilitaria – e tu sei nell’utilitaria” ricorda Paolo dal suo atterraggio del 2011.

Durante la missione di cinque mesi, Paolo ha orbitato la Terra 2.224 volte, volato attraverso 35.000 albe e tramonti, e viaggiato per 94 milioni di chilometri.

Questa è stata la terza missione e la terza visita alla Stazione Spaziale per Paolo, portando il tempo trascorso nello spazio a 313 giorni, al secondo posto per un astronauta ESA dopo Thomas Reiter.

Vita è la terza missione di lunga durata dell’Agenzia Spaziale Italiana – ASI – frutto di un accordo con la NASA in cambio della fornitura di moduli per la Stazione.

Ritorno alla vita sulla Terra

...

Paolo ha portato a termine oltre 60 esperimenti durante la sua missione denominata Vita, acronimo di Vitalità, Innovazione, Tecnologia ed Abilità.



Il suo stesso corpo è stato oggetto di ricerca: i suoi occhi, i suoi mal di testa, gli schemi di sonno e le abitudini alimentari sono stati monitorati per comprendere meglio come l’uomo si adatti alla vita nello spazio.

Le annotazioni della temperatura corporea, gli esercizi muscolari e abbondanti campioni di sangue e di saliva completeranno il quadro e prepareranno l’uomo per future missioni lontano dalla Terra.

Dall’orbita a circa 400 km sopra il pianeta, Nespoli ha inviato i comandi ad un robot umanoide in Germania per riparare tre pannelli solari danneggiati su un terreno marziano simulato, mostrando come astronauti e robot lavoreranno insieme nelle future missioni planetarie.

La vita nello spazio potrebbe diventare più facile grazie a tablet e smartphone – Paolo ha testato un sistema vivavoce che visualizza le istruzioni durante delle attività complesse.

...

Due capsule Soyuz agganciate alla ISS

C’è stato molto traffico durante la missione Vita: Paolo ha dato il benvenuto a cinque veicoli in visita e ne ha visti tre lasciare di nuovo la Stazione. Ha preso parte all’attracco di due veicoli utilizzando il braccio robotico della Stazione, ed ha dato supporto a quattro uscite extra veicolari.

Paolo sarà ora impegnato con riunioni e test. Gli astronauti subiscono una forma di rapido invecchiamento nello spazio e devono riadattarsi a vivere in condizioni di gravità. Gli scienziati studieranno come il suo corpo reagisce, come caso di studio.

Il prossimo astronauta ESA a viaggiare verso la Stazione sarà Alexander Gerst, il cui lancio è previsto la prossima estate.

...